This blog is about the relationship between organizations and the people who work for them. And, it’s dedicated to the millions of people around the world who go to work every day wanting to do a great job.

From campaign to composition

Let’s face it, we live in an event, event, event world.  One event after another.  Big events and small events.  A new brand. A new executive. A new policy. The latest quarterly results. A new acquisition. A divestiture. A new product.  A flood of separate moments. From an employee point of view it can all look pretty disconnected and confusing.

The challenge we have as leaders is to have these discrete events build momentum toward the business results we’re after.

But in an event, event, event world here’s what usually happens. A big shiny new brand launch. A month or two of hints about what’s coming. Lots of energy and hoopla focused on the day of launch. A campaign. Internally all goes incredibly well.  Better than expected in fact. Then nothing. Or maybe a little something. And then nothing.

Communications based on discrete events will only ever be just that. What’s missing? The composition, “the plan, placement or arrangement of the elements” in relationship to each other. The same events communicated in the context of the whole will build momentum and action toward the business results we’re after.

To move from a series of campaigns to composition takes a change in perspective.  It means looking at the events in context and understanding how each event impacts the other as well as how separately and together they support the overall business objectives over time.

It means understanding what these events separately and together look like from an employee [insert any other important stakeholder here] point of view. What does success look like? If the new brand [insert any important business event/announcement here] is a success, what will we see? Specifically how will it advance the business? What are the proof points? How and when will we know? How will we tell that story over time?

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As business leaders isn’t it time to insist on integrated communications strategies that will help build business momentum. Isn’t it time to move from communications campaigns to composition?

 

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Deborah Hinton Thursday, November 3rd, 2011
Permalink Communication, Internal communication No Comments

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